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HRSA-15-001aea0bf6c-98d8-480f-a343-ebe069accd67N/A7/15/20144/3/2014B04Maternal and Child Health Services93.994 Open
 
Cooperative Agreement False Guidance Availablility Yes
Purpose The purpose of the Title V MCH Services Block Grant Program is to create Federal/State partnerships in all 59 States and Jurisdictions to develop service systems to meet MCH challenges which include the following:  (1) Significantly reducing infant mortality; (2) Providing comprehensive care for all women before, during, and after pregnancy and childbirth; (3) Providing preventive and primary care services for infants, children, and adolescents; (4) Providing comprehensive care for children and adolescents with special health care needs; (5) immunizing all children; (6) Reducing adolescent pregnancy; (7) Preventing injury and violence; (8) Putting into community practice national standards and guidelines for prenatal care, for healthy and safe child care, and for the healthy supervision of infants, children, and adolescents; (9) assuring access to care for all mothers and children; and (10) meeting the nutritional and developmental needs of mothers, children, and families.
Eligibility Information Not Available
HRSA-14-0335fa8940f-975a-424f-a7e7-8f188a31a44e4/29/2014N/A2/25/2014H56Grants to States for Loan Repayment93.165 Open
 
Cooperative Agreement False Guidance Availablility Yes
Purpose This announcement solicits applications for the State Loan Repayment Program (SLRP).  The purpose of this program is to make grants to States, the District of Columbia, and U.S. Territories to assist them in operating their own state educational loan repayment programs for primary care providers working in Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSAs) within their State.  SLRP serves to support the HHS goal to strengthen the nation’s human service workforce, and HRSA’s goal to recruit and retain high quality health care professionals to practice in rural and urban settings designated as HPSAs.  Placing the right professionals in the right geographic areas increases access to primary health care for the nation’s underserved populations.  HPSAs are categorized based on shortages in primary medical care, dental, and/or mental health care, and include designations for geographic location, population, and facility types. Within statutory and regulatory guidelines, SLRP grantees are afforded the flexibility to select the disciplines and HPSA sites that meet the needs of their State or U.S. Territory.
Eligibility Information Not Available
HRSA-14-130894d4cfb-80c9-4559-9e56-a787ddeeb42a4/30/2014N/A3/20/2014D67Public Access93.259 Open
 
Cooperative Agreement False Guidance Availablility Yes
Purpose This announcement solicits applications for the Office of Rural Health Policy’s Public Access to Defibrillation Demonstration Project (PADDP) Grant Program.  The purpose of this grant program is to:  (1) purchase AEDs that have been approved, or cleared for marketing by the Food and Drug Administration; (2) provide basic life training in automated external defibrillator usage through nationally recognized courses; (3) provide information to community members about the public access defibrillation demonstration project to be funded with the grant; (4) provide information to the local emergency medical services (EMS) system regarding the placement of AEDs in the unique settings; and (5) further develop strategies to improve access to AEDs in public places.
Eligibility Information Not Available
HRSA-14-129f252f9b8-6e51-46f6-8e35-e43d58a8f8744/30/2014N/A3/20/2014H3DRAED93.259 Open
 
Cooperative Agreement False Guidance Availablility Yes
Purpose This announcement solicits applications for the Rural Access to Emergency Devices (RAED) Grant Program.  The purpose of the RAED Grant Program is to develop community partnershps to purchase automated external defibrillators (AEDs), provide defibrillator and basic life support training, and place the AEDs in rural communities with local organizations.
Eligibility Information Not Available
HRSA-14-095d7f7c8dc-6057-403a-9326-e568362516fa4/30/2014N/A2/21/2014UF7Safe Infant Sleep Systems Integration (SISSI) Program93.110 Open
 
Cooperative Agreement True Guidance Availablility Yes
Purpose This announcement solicits applications for the Safe Infant Sleep Systems Integration (SISSI) Program.  SISSI aims to increase the adoption of safe infant sleep behavior among infant caregivers by activating champions of these protective behaviors within systems that intersect with families at risk.  An infant caregiver is defined as the individual who puts a baby down for sleep and could be a parent, grandparent, other family members, child care provider or other guardian.  Examples of systems that serve infant caregivers include, but are not limited to, home visiting programs, food and nutrition programs, community-based organizations such as Healthy Start, housing assistance authorities, child care, hospitals, community health clinics, as well as health care provider networks such as pediatricians, family physicians and obstetricians. The death of a baby before his or her first birthday is called infant mortality.  Sleep-related deaths are the leading cause of death for infants between one month and one year of age, often referred to as sudden unexpected infant death (SUID).  These SUID deaths can be attributed to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), accidental suffocation, or unknown cause of death.  While all populations are impacted, African-American and American Indian/Alaskan Native families have a significantly higher risk to suffer the loss of an infant due to sleep-related circumstances.[1]  The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has summarized the state of scientific evidence surrounding these behaviors and identified the following description of a safe sleep environment: placing the infant to sleep on the back, in the infant’s own crib without blankets or soft items or bed-sharing, and breastfeeding.[2]  In this funding opportunity announcement, this cohort of behaviors is referred to as “safe infant sleep behavior.”  Infant caregivers face barriers to implementing safe infant sleep behavior, which can conflict with cultural and familial norms about sleep habits, or even compete with caregiver needs related to sleep deprivation. Providers who serve at-risk families in the delivery of health care, public health and social services have an opportunity to educate and empower infant caregivers to adopt safe infant sleep behavior.  However, promoting the latest evidence-based recommendations is more complex than the original “Back to Sleep” campaign message, which focused solely on infant sleep position.  To be successful, providers must be supported by organizational policies, practices and resources to enhance their efforts to translate the modern safe infant sleep message to action among infant caregivers. Some resources do exist to support these provider networks.  The expanded “Safe to Sleep” campaign led by the National Institutes for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) was launched in October, 2012, and provides communication materials that define and depict safe sleep behavior based on the 2011 AAP Policy Statement.  In addition, organizations at the state and local level have developed interventions to translate the safe infant sleep recommendations to action among families at risk.  However, no national, coordinated strategy to achieve measurable impact in reducing sleep-related infant death currently exists.  Implementing individual behavior change on a national scale requires a multi-faceted approach that ensures common messaging through engagement of multiple stakeholders, and support of organizations within service delivery systems that intersect with infant caregivers. Over the next three years, the cooperative agreement recipient will provide leadership by establishing, facilitating, and coordinating a national safe infant sleep coalition with the purpose of integrating safe sleep promotion throughout systems that serve families, with a particular emphasis on reaching communities at higher risk for SUID.  Activities of the project should be organized into two categories: Strategic Planning Identifying and convening multi-disciplinary stakeholders to form a national coalition, ensuring representation from the following four domains: safe sleep promotion experts, including researchers and public health professionals with experience designing and implementing safe sleep educational interventions, breastfeeding advocates, leadership of key systems serving families, as described in Section I.1: “Examples of systems that serve infant caregivers include, but are not limited to, home visiting programs, food and nutrition programs, community based organizations such as Healthy Start, housing assistance authorities, child care, children’s hospitals, community health clinics, as well as health care provider networks primary care providers such as pediatricians, family physicians and obstetricians.”, and advocacy groups representing communities at increased risk for SUID, such as African-American and American Indian/Alaskan Native families. Each of these four domains brings a crucial perspective that can provide insight to existing barriers to achieving a unified movement in safe sleep promotion.  For example, breastfeeding promotion professionals might clarify in which ways the recommendation to avoid bed-sharing may be perceived as disruptive to increasing breastfeeding rates among mothers.  Leadership from key systems that serve families can provide insight to realistic boundaries for policy and practice levers that can be activated to further enhance the safe sleep message.  And representatives from the communities at increased risk for SUID can heighten the success of the program by providing feedback about the reality of barriers that infant caregivers face when considering safe sleep as a practice. Facilitating the coalition’s development of a strategic plan to unify and augment the safe sleep message across systems that reach infant caregivers based on evidence based recommendations. Identifying key resources available and gaps preventing the successful implementation of safe sleep promotion priorities identified in the strategic plan. Advancement of Systems Changes Leveraging partnerships to advance the recommended organizational policies and practices outlined in the strategic plan, including the tracking of systems changes at the national, state and local levels. Coordinating the development of resources such as training modules, model policy templates or health promotion materials, to facilitate the attainment of goals related to safe infant sleep promotion at the national and local levels The strategic plan produced through this program will serve as a foundational framework to inform national, state and local infant mortality reduction efforts, as well as guide policy and practice changes among systems that serve families.  Recommendations within the strategic plan should address a variety of domains, including the following four MCHB-funded initiatives that intersect with safe infant sleep promotion: MCHB’s Collaborative Innovation and Improvement Networks (CoIINs) to Reduce Infant Mortality: the first 18 states to participate in CoIIN identified SUID/SIDS as a priority area of focus for the project, and additional states have the opportunity to do the same as the initiative is launched across the country. the Maternal and Child Health Block Grant Program: this program has a longstanding charter to address infant mortality, including SUID/SIDS, most specifically cited within Outcome Measure #5- the post-neonatal mortality rate per 1,000 live births. Healthy Start programs: one benchmark for these community-based programs aims to increase the proportion of Healthy Start participants who engage in safe sleep behaviors to 80%. Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting programs: several of the approved home visiting models, such as the Nurse Family Partnership, include safe sleep promotion as a standard of practice within home visits. During the project, the awardee will be expected to work collaboratively with organizations providing technical assistance to these programs, currently organizations such as the Children’s Safety Network National Resource Center and the National Center for the Review and Prevention of Child Death. This funding opportunity directly contributes to the achievement of two Healthy People 2020 Objectives: MICH-1.9 Reduce the rate of infant deaths from sudden unexpected infant deaths, and MICH-20 Increase the proportion of infants who are put to sleep on their backs.  It also is responsive to the January 2013 recommendations of the Health and Human Services Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality (SACIM); this Committee recommended to Secretary Sebelius the redeployment and modernization of key evidence-based, highly effective preventive interventions, specifying safe sleep as a priority[3].  The program also advances HRSA’s strategic goals to build healthy communities and to improve health equity by addressing a public health problem that contributes to health disparities in infant mortality. Success for this program can be estimated through changes in the prevalence of safe infant sleep behavior, estimated through the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), as well as through metrics describing the efficacy of the coalition in achieving the adoption of policy and programmatic goals set forth in the strategic plan.  Of particular emphasis are measurable systems changes which empower families to embrace the safe sleep message, attain the skills and self-efficacy to implement the behavior, and further drive social norms toward practices that keep babies safe and healthy.  These measures should include national, state, or local documentation of procedures or policies for delivery systems to support safe sleep.   Examples of appropriate process measures are: the proportion of target service delivery systems with performance measures incentivizing the integration of safe sleep promotion into standardized practice, the proportion of MCH block grant programs that report successful integration of safe sleep promotion into their state’s WIC program, the number of hospitals that adopt safe sleep policies, the proportion of community health centers that have provided safe sleep training to their staff, the proportion of child death review prevention recommendations that align with the latest science on SUID risk factors, the number of new stakeholder organizations which publicly endorse safe sleep practices, etc. [1] http://cdc.gov/sids [2] http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2011/10/12/peds.2011-2284 [3] http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/mchbadvisory/InfantMortality/About/natlstrategyrecommendations.pdf
Eligibility Information Not Available
HRSA-14-136d0e1c678-387d-4320-8719-5bf491979ef64/30/20145/14/20143/27/2014H80Health Center Cluster93.224 Open
 
Cooperative Agreement False Guidance Availablility Yes
Purpose The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) administers the Health Center Program as authorized by section 330 of the Public Health Service (PHS) Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 254b). Health centers improve the health of the Nation’s underserved communities and vulnerable populations by assuring access to comprehensive, culturally competent, quality primary health care services. Health Center Program grants support a variety of community-based and patient-directed public and private nonprofit organizations that serve an increasing number of the Nation’s underserved. Individually, each health center plays an important role in the goal of ensuring access to services, and combined, they have had a critical impact on the health care status of medically underserved and vulnerable populations throughout the United States and its territories. Targeting the Nation’s neediest populations and geographic areas, the Health Center Program currently funds approximately 1,200 health centers that operate nearly 9,000 service delivery sites in every state, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and the Pacific Basin. In 2012, more than 21 million patients, including medically underserved and uninsured patients, received comprehensive, culturally competent, quality primary health care services through the Health Center Program. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicits applications for the Health Center Program’s Service Area Competition-Additional Area (SAC-AA). The FOA details the SAC-AA eligibility requirements, review criteria, and awarding factors for organizations seeking a grant for operational support of an announced service area under the Health Center Program, including Community Health Center (CHC – section 330(e)), Migrant Health Center (MHC – section 330(g)), Health Care for the Homeless (HCH – section 330(h)), and/or Public Housing Primary Care (PHPC – section 330(i)). For the purposes of this document, the term "health center" refers to the diverse types of health centers (i.e., CHC, MHC, HCH, and /or PHPC) supported under section 330 of the PHS Act, as amended.
Eligibility Information Not Available
HRSA-14-089f0bc90ac-f15f-4d80-8ad9-484f6e25048f5/5/2014N/A4/3/2014U22Heritable Disorders93.110 Open
 
Cooperative Agreement True Guidance Availablility Yes
Purpose This announcement solicits applications for the Newborn Screening Data Repository and Technical Assistance Center.  The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to enable the awardee to: Enhance, improve, or expand the ability of State and local public health agencies to provide screening, counseling, or health care serviceds to newborns and children having or at risk for heritable disorders; Assist in providing health care professionals and newborn screening laboratory personnel with education in newborn screening and training in relevant and new technologies in newborn screening and congenital, genetic, and metabolic disorders; Develop and deliver educational programs (at appropriate literacy levels) about newborn screening counseling, testing, follow-up, treatment, and specialty services to parents, families, and patient advocacy and support groups; and Establish, maintain, and operate a system to assess and coordinate treatment relating to congenital, genetic, and metabolic disorders.
Eligibility Information Not Available
HRSA-14-127055e8e3c-8951-4f27-9d7b-5050cb02e0855/12/2014N/A3/13/2014R40MCH Research93.110 Open
 
Cooperative Agreement False Guidance Availablility Yes
Purpose The R40 MCH Autism Longitudinal Data Project supports the implementation and completion of research studies that examine longitudinal data on ASDs and other developmental disabilities to study risk factors of these conditions, the effects of various interventions, and trajectories of child development over the life course.  The Longitudinal Data Project will provide leadership and education in studies of ASD intervention using longitudinal methods.  The Longitudinal Data Project should address the following: Physical and behavioral aspects of development and assessment at different stages of life course development Underserved populations, including minority, urban or rural populations Early life origins and onset Maternal and perinatal origins High risk populations Development and course of condition Primary prevention Development of potential intervention studies HRSA, as the home of the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, is interested in analyses of rural-urban differences, where data allow.
Eligibility Information Not Available
HRSA-14-036f6fc7465-0cf2-4bd9-868c-2323ee5dc49d5/12/2014N/A3/13/2014UA3Autism Intervention Research Networks93.110 Open
 
Cooperative Agreement True Guidance Availablility Yes
Purpose This announcement solicits applications for the MCH Health Care Transitions Research Network (HCT-RN) for Youth and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).  Support for this cooperative agreement is available from the Division of Research, Office of Epidemiology and Research (OER), Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Please read the entire funding opportunity announcement carefully before completing and submitting an application.    The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to support the creation of an interdisciplinary, multi-center research forum for scientific collaboration and infrastructure-building, with a focus on research designed to improve health care transitions and promote an optimal transition to adulthood among youth and young adults with ASD, including optimal physical, psychosocial, educational, and vocational outcomes.  The Network should include both adolescent and adult researchers across a range of disciplines reflecting attention to the health and development of the whole person. The HCT-RN will address the critical lack of research on life course influences at the person, family, community, health system, and policy levels prior to, during, and following the transition of youth and young adults with ASD from pediatric to adult care settings.  As part of HRSA’s Combating Autism Act Initiative (CAAI), the HCT-RN contributes to a collaborative effort to address autism and related developmental disabilities through education and intervention.  The work of this Network will complement the ongoing research and evaluation activities occurring both within the CAAI and in the research field broadly, and will have the following goals: Develop a national research agenda designed to improve health care transitions and promote an optimal transition to adulthood among youth and young adults with ASD, including healthy physical, social, and vocational outcomes, through research that focuses on: Identifying factors that predict successful transition, and those factors within transition that affect outcomes; Understanding and identifying the components of successful transitions across a range of autism spectrum populations, including populations that remain underdiagnosed with regard to ASD, such as certain racial/ethnic minorities, and girls and young women; Examining the effectiveness of existing transition models and programs to see which ones work best and for whom; Addressing the need for evidence-based approaches to support transition to adulthood and employment, including social skills interventions; Addressing the critical lack of tested interventions for adolescents and young adults either to address the core symptoms of ASD (social impairments, communication, and repetitive behaviors) or to improve adaptive behaviors that increase the potential for independence; Comparing models at the systems level, taking into account the clear and still-emerging scientific findings regarding interactions among biological, social, and community processes, and the resulting need for integrating systems of services across physical and behavioral health domains. Identify cutting edge research priorities and use the national research agenda created by the Network to actively guide the Network’s implementation of research studies through both MCHB and external funding sources; Establish transition care guidelines and conduct quality improvement projects to improve transition care;  Disseminate critical information and foster continued education activities on its research findings to inform researchers, professionals, policy makers, the public, and other stakeholders, including families with youth and young adults with ASD; and Improve the nation’s capacity to conduct research on health care transitions among youth and young adults with ASD by: building relevant data infrastructure; improving analytic methods, including the need to develop new measures that focus on valued outcomes such as improvement in quality of life; examining the use of technology in transition; and fostering research and mentorship opportunities for new investigators through active communication, networking, and collaboration.       The Network will use the national research agenda that it creates to: Actively guide the Network’s implementation of priority research studies through both MCHB and external funding sources; Advance the methods of studying the implementation and effectiveness of services that promote optimal transitions to adulthood for youth and young adults with ASD; Develop and/or contribute to approaches to data sharing that will expedite the translation of research results into knowledge, products, and procedures, and improve the standardization of data collection tools and transition care guidelines;  Develop quality measures to help monitor progress in improving care and outcomes for people with ASD; Contribute to the development of models of integrated care across traditionally disparate systems, including physical and behavioral health care; Improve the delivery of health care transition services for youth and young adults with ASD from a diverse range of backgrounds, including ethnic/racial, cultural, linguistic, soecioeconomic, and geographic (e.g., rural/urban); and Improve access to services and address health disparities among underserved populations, including girls and young women, who remain an underdiagnosed population with regard to ASD. HRSA, as the home of the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, is interested in analyses of rural-urban differences, where data allow.  Consistent with HRSA’s mission as the access agency to provide services to underserved populations, applicants for the HCT-RN should describe network activities that will address the needs of underserved populations, such as low-income, racial/ethnic minorities, individuals who otherwise have limited access to services, and/or other underserved populations as defined by the applicant.  The Maternal and Child Health Bureau’s intent is to ensure that research activities are responsive to the cultural and linguistic needs of special populations, that services are family-centered and accessible to consumers, and that the broadest possible representation of culturally distinct and historically underrepresented groups is supported through programs and projects sponsored by the MCHB.
Eligibility Information Not Available
HRSA-14-037339ca221-03b6-482a-b7c0-bee6cbdcbd315/12/2014N/A3/13/2014R40MCH Research93.110 Open
 
Cooperative Agreement False Guidance Availablility Yes
Purpose The R40 MCH Autism Intervention Research Program supports applied empirical research studies to advance the evidence base on the effectiveness of interventions to improve the health and well-being of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other developmental disabilities (DD) and to advance best practices for the screening and diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disabilities at an earlier age.  Consistent with HRSA’s mission as the primary Federal agency for improving access to health care services to underserved populations and improving health equity, applicants are encouraged to propose research studies that address the unique and unaddressed needs of underserved populations, by considering ethnic/racial, cultural, linguistic, socioeconomic, literacy and geographic (e.g., rural/urban) diversity of individuals for whom there is limited evidence of the effectiveness of interventions or for whom disparities in identification of ASD exist with limited understanding of the reasons for these disparities and evidence-based ways to close these gaps.  HRSA, as the home of the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, is interested in analyses of rural-urban differences, where data allow.   Examples of research topics of interest to MCHB include, but are not limited to, the following: Development of valid and reliable tools for earlier screening and diagnosis; Use of existing diagnostic tools to improve the translation to earlier detection; Early intervention to improve outcomes; Health care access and continuity of care; Interventions to address the comorbidities experienced by those with ASD and other developmental disabilities; Barriers to identification, diagnosis, and receipt of interventions for undeserved, low-resource, and low literacy populations, including issues pertaining to insurance coverage and reimbursement; Supporting the needs of individuals with more severe disability challenges, such as individuals with limited or no verbal communication; Implementation of treatments or specific treatment components that demonstrate efficacy in research settings into community settings and in partnership with service systems; Implementation and dissemination of evidence-based medical home systems of comprehensive and continuous medical care; Family engagement/partnerships and family well-being; Variations in access to services affecting family functioning in diverse populations; Service systems and infrastructure including: characterizing the current ASD diagnostic and service utilization patterns in community settings, examining the relationship between diagnosis and services availability for ASD, and evaluating services and intervention outcomes; Prevention strategies and interventions to address safety issues including wandering; Interventions for adolescents to address the core symptoms of ASD (social impairments, communication and repetitive behaviors) or to improve adaptive behaviors that increase the potential for independence; Cost effectiveness, delivery and use of evidence-based interventions for underserved populations.
Eligibility Information Not Available
HRSA-14-125cbd02688-85d0-4977-8985-fb534ed1f0c55/12/2014N/A3/13/2014R40MCH Research93.110 Open
 
Cooperative Agreement False Guidance Availablility Yes
Purpose The R40 MCH Autism SDAS Program supports secondary data analyses to advance the evidence base on the effectiveness of interventions and to advance best practices for the screening and diagnosis of ASD and other developmental disabilities at an earlier age.  Consistent with HRSA’s mission as the primary Federal agency for improving access to health care services to underserved populations and improving health equity, applicants are encouraged to propose research studies that address the unique and unaddressed needs of underserved populations, including low-income, racial/ethnic minorities, immigrants, and individuals for whom there is limited evidence of the effectiveness of interventions or for whom disparities in identification of ASD exist with limited understanding of the reasons for these disparities and evidence-based ways to close these gaps.  Proposals that address the unique barriers to identification and diagnosis and receipt of early interventions for underserved populations, issues pertaining to the financing/reimbursement of services, and the impact of coverage changes on services for children and adolescents with ASD and other developmental disabilities are also encouraged.  HRSA, as the home of the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, is interested in analyses of rural-urban differences, where data allow. Given existing investments, studies in the areas of autism prevalence, factors associated with prevalence, or autism and medical home will not be considered for funding under this R40 MCH Autism SDAS competition. Innovative secondary use of existing data from national datasets, administrative records and other publicly available datasets  from a variety of sources (e.g., National Database for Autism Research (NDAR), Medicaid, Mental Health Research Network) is encouraged.
Eligibility Information Not Available
HRSA-14-1243e971f87-63b8-4fe2-8dbd-08240f893eed5/19/2014N/A4/18/2014A03Public Health Traineeship93.964 Open
 
Cooperative Agreement False Guidance Availablility Yes
Purpose This announcement solicits applications for the Public Health Traineeship (PHT) Program.  The purpose of this program is to provide grants to accredited schools of public health and/or other public or nonprofit private institutions accredited for the provision of graduate or specialized training in public health to support traineeships in severe workforce shortage disciplines to eligible individuals enrolled in a post-bachelor’s degree certificate program, a master’s program, or a doctoral program in public health.  The PHT Program will provide traineeship support to cover the costs associated with tuition, fees, stipends, and allowances (including travel and subsistence expenses and dependency allowances) for students pursuing graduate level education in one of six disciplines (epidemiology, environmental health, biostatistics, toxicology, nutrition, and maternal and child health), representative of current severe workforce shortage areas as identified in the statutory language.  The traineeship support is to encourage students to pursue and continue their training in the public health shortage disciplines identified.  Students receiving traineeship support must also participate in public health practice-based field placements particularly in state and local health departments and/or underserved communities as part of their training.
Eligibility Information Not Available
HRSA-14-08138017ea2-a988-4ff2-b978-17de7b0740635/23/2014N/A4/16/2014X02ACA HV Program93.505 Open
 
Cooperative Agreement False Guidance Availablility Yes
Purpose This announcement solicits applications for the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) formula grant program, established by the Affordable Care Act (ACA), to continue the delivery of voluntary early childhood home visiting program services in response to a statewide needs assessment.  This program is being undertaken as part of the shared commitment of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) to comprehensive family services, coordinated and comprehensive voluntary statewide home visiting programs,[1] and effective implementation of high-quality evidence-based practices.  The MIECHV formula grant program is designed to: (1) strengthen and improve the programs and activities carried out under Title V of the Social Security Act; (2) improve coordination of services for at-risk communities; and (3) identify and provide comprehensive services to improve outcomes for families who reside in at-risk communities.  The statute reserves the majority of funding for the delivery of services through use of one or more evidence-based home visiting service delivery models.  In addition, it supports continued innovation by allowing up to 25 percent of funding to support service delivery through promising approaches that do not yet qualify as evidence-based models.   Note:  To ensure that the required statutory distribution is maintained, HRSA requires that all MIECHV programs demonstrate that they are being delivered in conformity with the approved service delivery models.  This fidelity is demonstrated by programs that have the requisite designation and/or approval from a model developer to provide evidence-based home visiting services.  MIECHV-funded programs must maintain the requisite designation and/or approval from the model developer while receiving MIECHV funding. ACA Outreach and enrollment activities are tied to benchmarks 1, 5, and 6 (see http://mchb.hrsa.gov/programs/homevisiting/ta/resources/guidanceoct2012.pdf). MIECHV programs should play a role in implementing the ACA by assisting participants in enrolling in expanded health insurance coverage beginning in 2014, using clinical preventive services and accessing primary health care, and understanding the ACA consumer protections. Working closely with Title V MCH Directors and State Medicaid Directors, MIECHV State Project Directors will ensure that Home Visitors have the state-specific information necessary to connect individuals with Navigators (Federally-facilitated Marketplace) or Non-Navigator Assistance Personnel (State based Marketplace or State Partnership Marketplace) and Certified Application Counselors.  These Navigators and Non-Navigator assistance personnel play a vital role in helping consumers prepare electronic and paper applications in order to establish eligibility.  This includes steps to help the individual find out if they qualify for insurance affordability programs such as premium tax credits, cost sharing reductions, Medicaid, or CHIP.  Certified Application Counselors will provide many of the same tasks as Navigators and Non-Navigator assistance personnel- including educating consumers and helping them complete an application for coverage. [1] A “state home visiting program” is an overall effort, by the MIECHV grantee, to effectively implement home visiting models (or a single home visiting model) in the state’s at-risk community(ies) to promote improvements in the benchmark and participant outcome areas as specified in the legislation.
Eligibility Information Not Available
HRSA-14-0487d6c2b8e-d1ec-4988-92f4-5f7c7007af005/28/2014N/A3/27/2014X08Part B Supplemental93.917 Open
 
Cooperative Agreement False Guidance Availablility Yes
Purpose This announcement solicits applications for the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program States/Territories Part B Supplemental Grant Program.  The purpose of this program is to supplement the HIV care and treatment services provided by the States/Territories.  The amount of funding is determined by the applicant’s ability to demonstrate the need in the State/Territory based on an objective and quantified basis.  Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWHAP) Part B Supplemental funding is used to assist States and Territories in developing and/or enhancing access to a comprehensive continuum of high quality care and treatment services for low-income individuals and families living with HIV.  As such, it supports the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) goals of:  reducing HIV incidence, increasing access to care and optimizing health outcomes, and reducing HIV-related health disparities.  In July 2013, the President issued an Executive Order “HIV Care Continuum Initiative” which is intended to accelerate improvements in HIV prevention and care in the United States through this initiative.  Additional information about this initiative may be found at this link:(http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/07/15/executive-order-hiv-care-continuum-initiative). Applicants must demonstrate the severity of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the State/Territory, using quantifiable data on HIV epidemiology, co-morbidities, cost of care, the service needs of emerging populations, unmet need for core medical services, and unique service delivery challenges.  Applicants must explain why supplemental funding is necessary to provide HIV care and treatment services for people living with HIV and AIDS in the State/Territory. As required in the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Legislation, Section 2620(b) of the Public Health Service Act, information to be used to demonstrate need for the FY 2014 application includes the following: The current prevalence of HIV/AIDS; The unmet need for HIV-related services as determined by section 2617(b) of the PHS Act; An increasing need for HIV/AIDS-related services based on increases in the number of living cases of HIV/AIDS; Increases in the number of living cases of HIV/AIDS within new or emerging subpopulations; Relevant factors related to the cost and complexity of delivering health care to individuals with HIV/AIDS in the eligible area; The impact of co-morbid factors, including co-occurring conditions including high rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), Hepatitis, Tuberculosis, substance use, severe mental illness, and other co-morbid factors; The prevalence of homelessness; The prevalence of individuals who were released from federal, state or local prisons during the preceding three years, and had HIV/AIDS on the date of their release; Relevant factors that limit access to health care including geographic variation, adequacy of health insurance coverage and language barriers; and Impact of a decline in the amount of Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Part B funding received on services available to all individuals with HIV/AIDS identified and eligible for RWHAP services. A comprehensive HIV/AIDS continuum of care includes the following core medical services: outpatient and ambulatory health services, AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) medications, AIDS pharmaceutical assistance (local), oral health care, early intervention services, health insurance premium and cost sharing assistance, home health care, medical nutrition therapy, hospice services, home and community-based health services, mental health services, medical case management, treatment adherence services, and substance abuse outpatient care as well as appropriate supportive services that assist PLWH in accessing treatment of HIV infection that is consistent with HHS Treatment Guidelines.  The guidelines provide standards of care recommendations for antiretroviral treatment, including prophylaxis and treatment of opportunistic infections.  The current HHS Treatment Guidelines are available at www.aidsinfo.nih.gov. Comprehensive HIV/AIDS care also includes access to the following support services: case management (non-medical), child care services, emergency financial assistance, food bank/home delivered meals, health education/risk reduction, housing services, legal services, linguistic services, medical transportation services, outreach services, psychosocial support services, referral for health care/supportive services, rehabilitation services, respite care, residential substance abuse services and treatment adherence counseling.
Eligibility Information Not Available
HRSA-14-085881be5bd-0eb1-4fdc-b08b-d2704745f2dd6/2/2014N/A4/16/2014U36Assessment of Newborn Screening93.110 Open
 
Cooperative Agreement True Guidance Availablility Yes
Purpose This announcement solicits applications for the Newborn Screening Clearinghouse (Clearinghouse).  The purpose of this program is to establish and maintain a central, online repository or clearinghouse of current educational information, materials, resources, research, and data on newborn screening, including information on family support services, follow-up services, and national and state policies and best practices to enable parents, family members, and expectant individuals to increase awareness, knowledge and understanding  of newborn screening and newborn diseases; and to maintain current data on quality indicators to measure performance of newborn screening, such as false-positive rates and other quality indicators as determined by the Discretionary Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children (DACHDNC). More specifically, the goals of the Clearinghouse are to: Create an interactive, web-based forum orgainized in a clear format for multiple audiences that promotes information sharing and dissemination of authoritative and/or evidence-based: lay informational and educational materials; community training initiatives; health care provider educational materials; newborn screening best practices and guidelines; and other information and tools that promote culturally sensitive education and decision-making regarding newborn screening for heritable disorders. Conduct activities to increase awareness, knowledge and understanding of newborn screening for parents and family members of newborns, health professionals, industry representatives, policy-makers, and other members of the public. Conduct activities to increase awareness, knowledge and understanding of newborn screening polices determined by the DACHDNC. Conduct activites to increase awareness, knowledge and understanding of newborn screening of newborn genetic conditions and screening services for expectant individuals and families. Promote and support communities in their efforts to understand the newborn screening process that is specific to their community, region and/or State. Promote national and state level policies and best practices regarding newborn screening. Form partnerships with various stakeholders including Federal and non-Federal organizations, as well as other HHS funded organizations in order to collaborate, coordinate, promote, and support their efforts and to inform innovative methods of dissemination and educational outreach. Develop a robust evaluation plan that analyzes project activities and results. Requirements: Consult with newborn screening, genetics, information technology, health education, medical home, health literacy, cultural competency and patient/family-centered care experts to design a system that will serve the needs of diverse populations and stakeholders. Create a system that can identify and review evidence-based newborn screening best practices and information and tools that promote culturally competent education and decision-making regarding newborn screening for heritable disorders and disseminate through an interactive web-based forum. Ensure that the Clearinghouse is available on the Internet and is updated at least quarterly. Provide links to websites and other sources of credible information regarding newborn screening, including but not limited to Government-sponsored, nonprofit, and other Internet websites of laboratories that have demonstrated expertise in newborn screening that supply research-based information on newborn screening tests currently available throughout the United States. Provide information and/or links about the newborn conditions and screening services available in each State from certified newborn screening laboratories including information about supplemental screening that may be available. Form partnerships with various newborn screening stakeholders including HRSA/MCHB funded grantees and other Federal and non-Federal organizations. Support HHS funded organizations and other stakeholders’s efforts in data collection for quality improvement in the newborn screening system and provide links to current quality indicators that measure performance of newborn screening. Provide links to current research on conditions for which newborn screening tests are available. Provide information about the availability of Federal funding for newborn and child screening for heritable disorders. Maintain an interactive newborn screening community forum. Develop a robust methodological evaluation to specifically measure usability, accuracy, completeness, currency, and objectivity of the information on the Clearinghouse site and to assess reach of the information disseminated by the Clearinghouse.Activities should support the collection of qualititative and quantitative data to measure the impact of the Clearinghouse. Ensure that the activities proposed minimizes duplication and supplements, not supplants, existing information sharing efforts.
Eligibility Information Not Available

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